Best 27 Ways to Respond to “Touch Grass”

What does “touch grass mean?” “Touch grass” simply implies that you are spending too much time in your room and you need to step out.

This can be used in arguments. When two people are arguing about something that has to do with happenings in society, one person can tell the other to touch some grass.

This means the other person needs to see the real world instead of judging from his or her room.

Sometimes, it is just an excuse to boast about knowing more than another person. The person would be acting like a know-it-all, boasting about his or her knowledge and experience, and undermining yours.

How would you respond to this person? This article answers that.

Perfect 27 Responses to Someone Saying “Touch Grass”

Ways to Respond to Touch Grass

  1. How about you touch some grass outside your neighborhood?
  2. No problem if that’s what you think.
  3. You don’t think I leave home?
  4. I know what I’m saying.
  5. I go out often.
  6. There’s nothing out there.
  7. I’ve been kicking grass my whole life.
  8. Don’t judge the world by your environment.
  9. I should. I haven’t left home in a long time.
  10. How much do you know?
  11. When last did you leave your neighborhood?
  12. I’ve been to places.
  13. It’s more peaceful in here.
  14. I’m not a novice.
  15. What’s the grass going to do for me?
  16. I am resting for a while
  17. I’m still very busy now.
  18. I live in the grass.
  19. You know what? Forget it.
  20. How much grass have you touched?
  21. Now, you sound like a know-it-all
  22. I prefer to stay home all day
  23. I really have nowhere to go.
  24. It’s fine then. I’ll leave you to your belief.
  25. Do you care to take me out?
  26. I am forced to stay home
  27. Thank you.

How about you touch some grass outside your neighborhood?

Nothing stops you from throwing the phrase back at the person. However, you have to know the meaning of the phrase and make sure you are using it correctly in the conversation.

When a person tells you to touch grass, it means you should leave your home and go out. It also means that the person knows more than you because he or she goes out of his or her home.

This response only works when the phrase has been used in an argument. When you say this, you are implying that you go out often and it’s the other person who needs to go to more places instead of judging the world by his or her neighborhood.

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This will most likely help you win the argument, especially if you are able to show that you have gone to many places that prove your point in the argument.

No problem if that is what you think.

Most people do not like this kind of dismissive response but it may be what they deserve.

You may be tempted to tell a person to touch some grass in an argument but it only makes sense if it is necessary to prove your point.

A person can repeat a particular point endlessly and tell you to touch some grass because you keep having a point to argue against him or her.

This does not necessarily mean that he or she is right or that he or she goes to more places than you do. However, it can be an excuse to say you don’t have experience.

If you are sure of what you are saying, you should just tell the person [No problem if that is what you think].

There is a high chance that no point from you will convince the person since he or she already believes himself or herself to be of more knowledge and experience.

You don’t think I leave home?

If a person tells you to touch grass in the middle of an argument, you can simply prove that you go to places and the person’s argument is still off.

When you ask this rhetorical question, the person will understand what you are implying. After this, you can start to mention the places you have been to and how the person’s points do not count in the argument.

After that, you can challenge the person to mention the places that back his or her points up.

I know what I’m saying

When a person gets adamant in an argument, you should know your points will not be listened to or considered. In that case, there may be no reason to keep trying to prove yourself.

When you give this response, you may sound like you are being adamant too and you are refusing to listen to another person’s point.

However, if a person is repeating his or her point and making no sense while claiming to have been to places, you may be unable to convince the person about your point.

In short, this may show that you are both adamant unless you know something that the person is not aware of and the person is not willing to hear you out.

I go out often

This sounds quite full as a response if you are arguing already. However, [Touch grass] is not only used in arguments.

You may be chatting with an old friend who thinks you always lock yourself in the house. When he tells you to touch some grass, he means you should go out and have fun.

You can tell him that you go out often and mention the places you have been recently.

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There’s nothing out there

Like the response suggested before this, it will sound dull if used in an argument. This would be even worse since it would suggest that the other person has won the argument.

By saying [Touch grass], the person means you cannot understand his point in the argument and cannot win until you go out and see the real world.

While your response should show that you have touched grass and your point still remains unshaken, this response shows that you don’t go out and you don’t want to.

It will portray you as an adamant person who does not want to listen to others, even when you are defeated.

I’ve been kicking grass my whole life

When a person tries to portray you as someone who does not go out, you can show off the places you have been to unless you don’t actually go out.

When a person tells you to touch grass, portraying you as someone who is indoors at all times, you will appear like a novice so you should prove that you are just as experienced.

Don’t judge the world by your environment

This may not mean what you are thinking right now. When you say this, you are telling the person not to determine what is happening in the entire world by what is happening in his or her environment.

The person is telling you to go to places and is indirectly implying that he has been to places.

This response implies that you have also been to places and the other person is only judging the rest of the world by what is happening in his or her environment.

I should. I haven’t left home in a long time

This can be used when a friend asks you to leave home and mix with people. It means you haven’t been out of your house in a while and you should take the advice.

You can also use this in an argument if you want to yield to the other person’s argument. It may also be used sarcastically if you are tired of arguing.

How much do you know?

When a person tells you to touch grass in an argument, it is indirectly implied that you are a novice because you don’t leave home. There should be no big deal if the person explains how much he or she knows.

If you don’t leave home truly, you should probably yield to the person’s argument. This response will make you sound adamant about your point.

When last did you leave your neighborhood?

As stated earlier, some people use their experience as an excuse in arguments, and sometimes the experience they speak of is false.

If you realize that the person is only asking you to touch grass to win the argument, you can ask this question.

This response may also imply that the person only moves within his/her neighborhood and is trying to judge the rest of the world by what he/she sees around him/her.

I’ve been to places

In an argument about reality and society, you may want to mention the places you have been and how they relate to the point you are making.

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The other person is telling you that he or she has been to places that back up his or her point. You should also state yours.

It’s more peaceful here

When your friend advises you to step out of your home and mix with the world, you can say this if you are not willing to do so.

He or she will definitely argue against that and you can say why you think your home is more peaceful than hanging out with people.

I’m not a novice

When a person tells you to touch grass, he or she is indirectly suggesting that you don’t know some things because you are always indoors. You can point out that you are not a novice.

What’s the grass going to do for me?

Don’t say this in an argument. It implies that you do not leave your home and you do not think it is important to do so.

You will be losing the argument by saying this. However, you can yield to the other person’s argument with this.

You may also say this if your friend advises you to leave home.

I am resting for a while

A close friend of yours may ask that you both leave home and touch some grass. You can say you are only resting in your home for a while.

This suggests that you used to go out but you are choosing to stay back home.

I’m still very busy now

This implies that you would love to leave home and touch some grass but you have things to do in your home.

Don’t say this in your argument unless you agree that your opponent has won.

I live on the grass

This should win your argument for you. When you say this, you must be able to explain that you go to many places so your opponent does not state that you are rooted in the neighborhood grass.

You know what? Forget it.

People may ask you to touch grass when arguing only to imply that they know more than you even if they don’t.

If you are sure about your point and the other person is not listening, tell him or her to forget it since the argument is pointless.

How much grass have you touched?

When a person tells you to touch grass, the person is implying that he or she has been to places. You can simply throw the phrase back as a question and ask about the places the person has been to.

With this, you will know if the person is only stating an excuse or not.

Now, you sound like a know-it-all

You can also point out the person’s know-it-all attitude. First, the person has assumed that you don’t go out.

Secondly, the person has assumed that he or she knows a thing about everywhere because he or she has been to a few places.

I prefer to stay home all-day

If a friend tells you to touch some grass, you can tell the person you prefer to stay in your home. You may also say why.

I really have nowhere to go

If you have no idea what grass to touch, you can say this. Your friend may offer to take you to places where you may hang out and meet other people.

It’s fine then. I’ll leave you to your belief

When a person is becoming adamant about his or her point while repeatedly asking you to touch some grass, your points may be useless in the argument so you can forget about saying anything more.

Do you care to take me out?

If your friend keeps telling you to touch some grass, you can make this suggestion.

I am forced to stay home

This is an explanation of why you don’t go out. You can state what makes you stay at home or what makes you unable to go out.

No. Thank you

When your friend keeps telling you to go out but you are unwilling, you can simply say no. This is even better if you don’t want to say why but you will be asked why.

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