15 Phrases Like “Don’t Trip the Chocolate Chip”

Have you come across phrases that leave you wondering what the speaker is talking about?

One of these phrases is “Don’t trip the chocolate chip.” This expression has nothing to do with chocolate chips. And I’m sure you’re wondering what it means.

You don’t have to worry, for in this article I’ll explain what this expression means. And if you need phrases you can use instead of “don’t trip the chocolate chip”, this article got you covered.

What Is the Meaning of “Don’t Trip the Chocolate Chip?”

“Don’t trip the chocolate chip” is an idiomatic expression that’s used to tell someone not to worry about something.

It isn’t a very popular phrase, so you may not come across it quite often. This expression has nothing to do with chocolate, but rather it’s a play on words intended to create a pun.

It’s just like saying, “Peace out, girl scout!” This is another punny idiomatic expression.

So, “Don’t trip the chocolate chip” means, “Don’t worry about it.”

15 Phrases Like”Don’t Trip the Chocolate Chip.”

There are numerous expressions like “don’t trip a chocolate chip.” When you want to tell someone not to worry, there are different ways you can say it.

You can directly tell them not to worry over something, or tell them not to stress over it. Also, you can tell them not to get in a flap.

Below are 15 similar phrases to “don’t trip the chocolate chip.”

  1. Don’t worry about it
  2. Don’t stress over it
  3. Don’t bother yourself
  4. Don’t over flog the issue
  5. Don’t cry over spilled milk
  6. Take it easy
  7. Don’t sweat it
  8. Don’t panic
  9. Don’t get in a flap
  10. Don’t dwell on it
  11. Don’t flog a dead horse
  12. Don’t fret over it
  13. Take a chill
  14. Loosen up
  15. Calm down

Don’t Worry About It

“Don’t worry about it” is one of the ways to say, “don’t trip the chocolate chip.” This expression is the idea behind this idiomatic phrase.

It’s a caring statement that’s said out of compassion for someone. Lots of people go through a lot daily and many are constantly worrying over one thing or the other.

So, this statement is a kind one that you can use to tell someone to quit thinking about a problem.

It could be that they complained about a problem at work, you could encourage them by asking them not to worry about it. In this case, you’re instigating that all will be well.

In addition, you can use this statement if you want to provide a solution to their problem or handle something they were supposed to handle.

For instance, you could tell your friend that complained about a problem at work not to worry about it because you’d talk to the manager.

Below is an example of how to use this phrase:

  • A- I couldn’t get my work completed today

B- Don’t worry about it, I’ll talk to the boss tomorrow

  • A- I feel scared, what if it doesn’t work out?
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B- don’t worry about it, it’ll work out fine

Phrases Like Don't Trip the Chocolate Chip

Don’t Stress Over It

“Don’t stress over it” is another expression you can use to tell someone to quit worrying over something.

When someone keeps hitting on a particular issue, maybe they’re bothered that their salary hasn’t yet arrived, you could tell them not to stress over it.

Also, it’s a comforting word that you can use to tell someone to quit being anxious about something and be positive instead.

In addition, just like the above, you can use this phrase to tell someone not to bother about something you’d take care of.

Here’s an example of how you can use the expression:

  • A- I still can’t find my file, what’s going on!?

B- Don’t stress over it, it’s somewhere here

  • A- I can’t seem to understand what I should do here

B- don’t stress over it, I’ll send you a sample

Don’t Bother Yourself

This is another expression that you can use instead of “don’t trip the chocolate.” It’s another nice way of telling someone not to worry about something.

When someone is overly concerned about a situation, you could tell them not to bother themselves about it. You can use the statement when you can help them out of the situation or when you just want to comfort them.

However, depending on your tone, you can use this statement to express your anger about someone reluctant to follow instructions you give them.

Below is how you can use the expression:

  • A- I have a lot to do, I don’t see myself going to the store now

B- don’t bother yourself, I’ll go later

  • A- I can’t go to the store, please find someone else

B- don’t bother yourself, you’re just too lazy

Don’t Over Flog the Issue

“Don’t over-flog the issue” is another idiomatic expression that you can use instead of “don’t trip the chocolate chip.”

It’s an expression you can use to tell someone not to dwell too long on an issue that has been resolved or has lost relevance.

If it’s the case that someone keeps complaining about the same thing over and over again, even after telling them to be calm, this is an appropriate response for them.

Here, you’re telling them to quit talking about it because it isn’t necessary. Probably because you promised to settle it or you feel nothing can be done about it again.

Here’s how you can use the idiom:

  • A- I repeated this several times to her. She shouldn’t have done it.

B- Stop over flogging the issue, I already agreed to talk to her

  • A- Why would Mike do this to me? I need to see him

B- Don’t over flog this issue, it’s over already

Don’t Cry Over Spilled Milk

“Don’t cry over spilled milk” is another great expression that can replace “don’t trip the chocolate chip.”

This is an old proverb that’s used to tell someone to stop stressing or worrying over something that can’t be undone.

Let’s look at the phrase literally. If liquid milk is spilled on the ground, we know it’s of no use anymore. You can’t put it back into the cup, nor can you drink it from the floor.

So, worrying or crying over it wouldn’t put it back into the cup. So, this phrase is suitable for situations that can’t be salvaged.

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It’s an encouraging statement you can say to someone to quit worrying about their failures and try to do better instead.

Here’s how you can use the expression:

  • A-I got an E on my result, it’s so bad. I don’t know what to do

B- don’t cry over spilled milk, focus on doing better this session

  • A- We lost the match but I won’t cry over spilled milk. I look forward to when next we’ll play

B- that’s the spirit

Take It Easy

This is another expression that can serve as an alternative to “don’t trip the chocolate chip.”

If it’s the case that someone keeps going on and on because they’re concerned about a task or a goal they want to meet, this is an appropriate expression for them.

Here, you’re telling them not to be too anxious about the task and take it easy. Also, It’s a good statement you can use on someone you’re concerned is overworking themselves.

It’ll serve as a reminder to them to slow down and rest.

Here’s how you can use the expression:

  • Take it, easy man, you keep talking about this race, you’ll do well
  • You need to take it easy brother, working this way will only affect your health

Don’t Sweat It

This is another way to tell someone not to worry about something. When someone keeps complaining about something that isn’t going well, you can use this expression to tell them to calm down.

If you intend to take care of the situation, it’s also an appropriate response for them.  Additionally, you can use this expression to tell someone not to worry about something that can’t be changed.

So, it’s a good alternative to “don’t trip the chocolate chip.”

Here’s how you can use the phrase:

  • A- I think something can still be done about this

B – don’t sweat it man, this is useless

  • A- I’m nervous about our exams tomorrow

B- don’t sweat it, we’ll do well

Don’t Panic

This is another phrase you can use to tell someone not to worry about something. In this case, however, the person has become too anxious and afraid.

So, this is a comforting phrase you can use to tell them to relax. Also, it’s an encouraging thing to say to someone when you want them to understand that things will be better so there’s no need for them to panic.

Additionally, you can say it to someone to reassure them about something you’ve taken care of or will take care of.

Here’s an example of how to use the phrase:

  • Don’t panic, the doctor knows what he’s doing
  • Don’t panic dear, I’ll talk to your lecturer tomorrow

Don’t Get in a Flap

To get in a flap means to become worried or unhappy about something. So, “don’t get in a flap” is another idiomatic expression that can replace “don’t trip the chocolate chip.”

When someone becomes over-anxious about something, this is the phrase for them.

Also, when someone becomes unhappy about the outcome of something, this is something to tell them if you want to be calm.

Here’s how you can use the expression:

  • Don’t get in a flap about things like this
  • My mother told me not to get in a flap about my interview tomorrow
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Phrases Like Don't Trip the Chocolate Chip

Don’t Dwell on It

Another way you can tell someone to relax and not to worry over something is to tell them not to dwell on it.

When someone has a problem and keeps talking or thinking about it, it becomes unhealthy because thinking about it isn’t helpful. So, “don’t dwell on it” are encouraging words to say to them to help them feel better.

  • Don’t dwell on the past, the future is bright
  • Don’t dwell on yesterday’s incident, we’ll resolve it once she arrives

Don’t Flog a Dead Horse

“Don’t flog a dead horse” is another idiomatic expression that you can use instead of “don’t trip the chocolate chip.”

This expression is an old saying that’s used to tell someone not to waste time or effort on something certain not to yield any positive result.

For instance, you can use this statement with someone who keeps bringing back an old discussion, letting them know it’s a waste of time.

Literally, you can’t flog a dead horse to force it to work for you, it’s already dead so it’s a waste of time.

Here’s how to use this idiomatic phrase:

  • A- I can’t this man failed me, I’ll go and talk to him tomorrow

B-  there’s no point flogging a dead horse, instead read harder for your next papers

  • A- I attempted talking to Mike, but he wouldn’t listen

B- don’t flog a dead horse, Mike has moved on

Don’t Fret Over It

To fret means to be visibly worried or overly anxious about something, that you might begin to shake or show signs of destabilization.

When you’re nervous about an operation, when you’re concerned about an interview, you can begin to fret over it if you can’t control your emotions.

So, “don’t fret over it” is an expression you can use to tell someone not to worry about something, and a good alternative to “don’t trip the chocolate chip.”

Here’s how you can use the expression:

  • Don’t fret over it, it won’t help
  • Having exams doesn’t mean you should fret over it, you only have to read

Take a Chill

“Take a chill” is another idiomatic expression that you can use to replace “don’t trip the chocolate chip.”

It’s an expression you use to tell someone to relax or calm down when they’re angry, stressed, or worried.

It’s a variation of “take a chill pill.” So, when someone is visibly angry or anxious about something, you can tell them to take a chill.

Here’s how to use the expression:

  • You’re worrying over nothing. Take a chill, I’ll handle it
  • Take a chill, you’re just returning from work

Loosen Up

Another phrase you can use to tell someone to quit worrying over something is “loosen up.”

When someone is tensed or anxious about something, you can tell them to loosen up. The thought behind this phrase is to get someone to relax and be calm.

Here’s how you can use the expression:

  • Loosen up, there’s no need to worry about it
  • I can see you’re nervous, loosen up, dear, I don’t bite

Calm Down

“Calm down” is another phrase you can use to tell someone worried or angry to relax.

It’s a nice way to comfort someone facing some difficulties, letting them understand that things can get better.

So, this is a good alternative to “don’t trip the chocolate chip.”

Here’s how you can use this expression:

  • Calm down, okay? everything will be alright
  • Calm down, something can still be done about it

Phrases Like Don't Trip the Chocolate Chip

Wrap Up

There are various ways to tell someone not to worry about something and rather be calm and relaxed. Consequently, various phrases can replace, “don’t trip the chocolate chip.”

So, when someone around you is worrying or stressing out about a situation, use any of the above expressions appropriately to relax them.

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